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your cia background. >> i worked at cia and nationalp intelligence counsel inac washington for about thirty fivl years.in >> what capacity? >> i became the national intelligence officer for latinee america which it a three or foua star military equivalent.on he was a civilian. it was a substantial position. i had responsibility for all of latin america and cuba. on the an lettic side oft -- intelligence. >> what does thatno mean? >> i was not a field operative. i did not go and conductof espionage. i did not go out and be foreignl agency. most of my career at headquarter mainly virginia. i wrote national intelligencean estimates. quite a few on cuba over the >> b years, and on many of the other ca latin american countries. how >> before we get to castro and the castro regime. at how did you get interested in the work? >> i was student at georgetownes university where i later taughte for about twenty five years as , an adjunct i'm teaching now atgo the university of miami. i was attracted to the foreigner service school at georgetown. it was a timeja when a lot of us of my generation
through the end including barack obama and michael morrell who was a deputy director of this cia who was president bush's national security briefer and had given his morning briefing when all hell broke loose and he spent the day flying with the president and gave me the prospective have that day was perceived with the inner circle. and said agco commander who had had a severe parachuting accident. he broke his bill this man was in a hospital for a while. and then had them moves abetted to his home. literally in his hospital bet at home watching on television as the attacks of september 11 to place. he spent his time serving as steel unit's commanding seal team six that the united states would go to war and his unit and the men would go to war and basically he was left out. he was not in any condition to walk at that point*. interesting to see where he ends up 10 years later. for my purposes that is registered its. to be, other trade that killed loathsome a bin laden as exciting as it is that is the last 40 minutes of the tenure story the most remarkable is the abolition to target pe
.c.. it takes place in cia headquarters, the pentagon, and at the white house. you know, it's funny for me to write a story about a military operation where 90% of the story takes place in washington, d.c., but that's where the story actually unfolded. today, unique, i think, among presidents of the united states, president obama is almost, daily, given a dossier on a target. this is someone in the cross hairs of the cia or the military, and obama or directer petraeus has to make a decision about whether to shoot at that target, whether to take that person out. now, i know that presidents have had to make critically important decisions affecting thousands and hundreds of thousands of lives throughout history of this country, but it seems to me to be a new development for the president of the united states to be deciding on individual targets around the world on a regular basis, and i think that that is probably one of the most unique developments in modern war, and that kind of defines right now the nature of the war that we're fighting. obama, when he said that he was, you know, willing t
will be in on this story at the end, including barack obama, including michael morel, now deputy to the cia, but on september 11 was president bush's national security brief traveling to florida and given its morning briefing when all broke loose and he spent the day flying over the country with the president and gave a very unique perspective on how that day was perceived by the president of the united states and his inner circle. another main character in the story is admiral bill mccray then it was a navy seal commander in 2001, who had a severe parachuting accident. yet in his pelvis and he was really all broken up. get to the hospital for a while and got so bored being in the hospital, had him of his hospital bed into his home in san diego. so she was the gui and his hospital bed at home watching the television as the attacks of september 11 to place. this is a guy who spent his young life training and serving with field units who had risen to the point of demanding a trade. the fealty of six. he knew watching this attack the united states would be going toward producing a mm would be
is to the cia what the count now congress is to the u.s. government after george????? washington became president.?? it has the major features and a? major mission features of the? centralized intelligence.???? the os us was very unique because it? was the first?? national intelligence service responsible to one command, and that is the president's. before that, before the zero ss was created, they had always been departmentalized. highly technical. you have the u.s. army, u.s. navy, the state department, the fbi, treasury, commerce. every major agency of the u.s. government had its own intelligence service of the specialized nature. so it was created to nationalize or centralized that intelligence existence, which is something that the model after the british . which is also very controversial nature because people always blame to pro-british. so it was a very interesting experience because of world war ii, the prime opportunity for the proponent of a centralized intelligence to prove its worth. and that is why the experience? was fascinating, and generally a lot of argument
of a white house objective there. on the other hand, as you know, he was interested in the cia position. and it is seen as the best possible position for him. he really shows how he has been a voracious consumer. he has worked with 16 different agencies in the intelligence community for quite a while. and he's he is very interested in what he can provide and understands. you know, maybe it is a blessing in disguise. i think the bottom line is that he is almost good for them to handle -- too good for them to handle. >> michael hastings actually torpedoed and the pentagon makes the parents of old america look like the french village of bohemians. it was indiscretion and fraternization somebody is not supposed to be buddy buddy with an inferior, and he was. but you have not touched upon us it is the problem of corruption and governance of all levels of the middle east. that involves the killers, the fanatic killers, the religious killers, the revenge killers. and how you deal with that. all it takes is one jerk to create havoc and community, and then the third thing in the middle east, at
ill prepared from the interrogation standpoint. the cia had no trained interrogators. the military had largely and still does interrogation as a low skill military operational specialty that 18 to 21-year-olds can do and does not invest much in training but certainly in 2001 did not invest much energy into training so for example an army in the military intelligence schools would get three days of training in the interrogation techniques, so frankly much of our interrogation wasn't competent. it had to be held in the contractors who carried in quality. the fbi had a skull the interrogators from the high value detainee's that came from higher levels special allegiance but for the most part this was caught flatfooted and they were prepared to do large-scale. we have slowly tried to improve that. to the obama's administration credit he said the high value detainee interrogation group which is an agency group which sends out interrogators' every time a high value is teaching and there is a research unit that stood out to study best practices and spend them out into the training academies t
? 1997 on the anniversary of the cia. and then 9/11 happened, and interestingly five they were -- the reviewer in the more immediate current affairs, so a few days later this. i will be interested with a lot of people began coming into the u.s. institute press had a god deal in the paperback of that. originally it was published byp? yale university press.p?p?t? >> maochun yu, how many american personnel were in china during world war ii? >> comparatively speaking very few. but, the pre-eminence of china given by the american politic and society its proportionate t any other area coming year, that's because the emotional tie  china, missionaries and college professors, adventures, ey all go to china so there i a strong relationship thing. there's also the rhetorical requirement for putting china at the high your place because of? the china of here collapsed america will have a major problem dealing with that, so a u.s. policy is world war ii to keep china.?????? but your reality?
background. particularly, your cia background. >> i worked at cia and the national intelligence council in washington for 35 years. >> in what capacity? >> ultimately, became the national intelligence officer for latin america, which is a three or four star military equivalent. i was a civilian, of course, but it's a substantial position. i had responsibility for all of latin america and cuba on the analytic side of intelligence. >> what does that mean? >> well, i was notysç a field operative. i did not -- i did not go out and conduct espionage. i did not meet foreign agents. i was basically, most of the career at headquarters, in virginia, i wrote national intelligence estimates, quite a few on cuba over the years, and on many of the other latin american countries. >> before we get into fidel castro and his regime, how did you get interested in that work? >> i was a student at georgetown university where i later taught for 25 years as an adjunct. teaches here now at the university of miami, but i was attracted to the foreign service school at georgetown. it was a time when a lot of us
. the cia had no trend interrogators. the military had largely -- the military did and to an extent still does treat interrogation as a low-skilled military operational specialty, and low-skilled jobs that 18-20 year olds can do and therefore it does not invest, did not invest much and training. has improved a bit, but certainly they do not invest much energy into trading. for example, an army recruit who goes to military intelligence school would get three days of training in interrogation techniques, only three days. so frankly, much of our interrogation was not competent. it had to be farmed out to contractors his varied in quality. the fbi had some skilled interrogators and some of the best intelligence we got from high-value detainees came from high-level special agents and the fbi. but for the most part this nation was caught flatfooted, well-prepared to do large-scale interrogations', and we have slowly, slowly tried to improve that. i think to the obama administration's credit when he came into office to set up something called the high
going with the cia. uk these agents to come in and out of the house, gather information for your and based on the information you act on that intelligence. we were running a very, very successful safe house in mogadishu, somalia. so successful in fact that we're able to get food all of the city, get most of the bad people who were like responsible for the civil war. but one that why was up on the roof of this safe house i smelled this horrible smell. and i'm not going to gross anybody out there, but if you've never smelled human flesh rotting come it's not like roadkill. it's like corba. it's like not eating them like he just got it away from. but i smelled the smell, and i'm like, tomorrow we've got to fight with his and get rid of it. the next morning i come upon the roof, which is where we would watch for agents coming in and out, and protect them as they're coming in and leaving the safe houses. and it didn't smell anything. so i'm like and what is that? maybe somebody was blowing through the neighbor something. the next i am up on the roof and i had this same smell again, an
the fbi and cia, some of those gems had even showed up in gem shops in arizona. so he was selling these gems to finance his whole, you know, this whole campaign. and, again, going back to that this is a remote valley, captain kyle walton and others on the team knew tactically that this plan was flawed. but even though they knew that it was flawed, knew that there was incredible danger landing the helicopter at the bottom of the valley and that they would have to climb to the top of the valley to get to this compound where they knew the bad guy was surrounded by some of the best mercenaries, so to speak, in the world, these really trained mercenaries who had been fighting the soviets and, for, you know, for that ten years during the 1980s, they still went, and they still went to carry out this mission. and i think, kevin, you can describe a little bit about what happened once they landed. >> okay. so they take off from a base on the border, jalalabad, and they fly into this valley. and there's some concern at this point about the plane. there's a certain window that they had that t
and cia were some of those have even showed up in shame shops in arizona. so you will find these gems to finance this whole campaign. again gordon back to this was the valley, the captain on the two new tactic with the plan was flawed. but even though the news that it was flawed, and that there was incredible danger and they would have to climb to the top of the mountain to get to this compound with a new it was surrounded by some of that, you know, some of the best mercenary so to speak at what really trained mercenaries were fighting for that 10 years. they still went and they still went to carry out this mission. i think you can describe a little bit of what happened when they went. >> okay, so they take off on the border of jalalabad and fly into this valley. there is some concern at this point obviously. there's concerned about the welfare comment there's a certain when that they could get in before the cloud cover can. they had to work quickly as well
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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